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Power of collaboration in ag research under the spotlight

Helping Aussie farmers

Many hands make light work – and many dedicated researchers make Australian agriculture stronger.

One example of this is the Broadacre Cropping Initiative (BACI), a partnership between the University of Southern Queensland (USQ) and Queensland’s Department of Agriculture and Fisheries (DAF), that is delivering applied and practical solutions to Queensland farmers.

Key projects being undertaken as part of the initiative will be highlighted at a research showcase at the University’s Toowoomba campus tomorrow (Tuesday Nov 23).

Scientists from USQ’s Institute for Life Sciences and the Environment (ILSE) will present updates on projects focused on a wide variety of issues, from fungicide resistance in major broadacre crop pathogens in Queensland to using machine vision technology to aid on-farm irrigation, nutrient, and crop management decisions.

Executive Director of ILSE Professor Gavin Ash said the work being done through the BACI was already delivering new answers to old problems that will have a long-lasting positive impact on farmers in south east Queensland and beyond.

“This collaboration digs deep into a really broad scope of fundamental research around plant protection, ag technology and modelling, and new tools that farmers can use to support their production,” Professor Ash said.

“The research showcase hits the highpoints of the partnership and is a very real, working example of how USQ is developing new aspects of research and supporting and complementing the work of DAF to expand the possibilities and outcomes for farmers in broadacre cropping.”

Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Research & Innovation) Professor John Bell will emcee the event and said BACI was a prime example of how universities, government and industry can work together to solve large problems.

“USQ has always been closely linked with agriculture and we continue to position ourselves as a leader in the field, both as an educational institution and as a research provider,” Professor Bell said.

“Collaboration is crucial to the success and ongoing growth of agriculture in Australia, and we hope that the BACI research showcase further supports potential collaborations between researchers and key stakeholders in attendance.”

A panel discussion on future directions for agricultural research, featuring representatives from GRDC, Incitec and Pulse Australia, will also be facilitated as part of the showcase.

The event is free to attend either in person or via Zoom Webinar. For more details and to register click here.

man in white coat smiling
Executive Director of ILSE Professor Gavin Ash said the work being done through the BACI was already delivering new answers to old problems that will have a long-lasting positive impact on farmers in south east Queensland and beyond.