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Celebrating the power of Higher Education

Marking World Access to Higher Education Day at the University of Southern Queensland
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When Amani Borghoul was a little girl growing up in Syria, she dreamed of having a job where she could help people.

Her journey to make that happen has been a difficult and disruptive one, but she’s now on track to achieve her goal of becoming a medical professional.

“When I was 11 the war started in Syria, so my family and I moved to Lebanon to leave the unpleasant circumstances,” Amani remembered.

“With the help of the United Nations we got the privilege to travel to Australia as refugees and next month I will celebrate five years living in this country.”

Amani enrolled in an intensive English language program through USQ College and this year started a Biomedical Science degree at the University of Southern Queensland’s Toowoomba campus.

“I am very interested in anatomy and how the body works. My main goal is to study medicine or nursing but right now I am just so proud to be studying at the University of Southern Queensland and being the only member of my family to study at this level,” she said.

Amani’s story will be shared at a special online event hosted by USQ together with NAEEA (National Association of Enabling Educators of Australia), and EPHEA (Equity Practitioners in Higher Education Australasia – Queensland) to celebrate World Access to Higher Education Day on Monday, November 15.

USQ College lecturer Charmaine Davis said while the number of people attending university has grown all around the world in recent years, there are still many very capable people who can’t access higher education.

“World Access to Higher Education Day is about raising awareness of this inequity, and about hearing the voices of students from all walks of life who have decided to pursue university study despite the barriers they might face,” Ms Davis said.

“Many people miss out on the opportunity to study at university or think that university study is out of their reach. Through pathway programs, students learn how to be successful university students and they often excel in their undergraduate programs and go on to pursue the careers they might only once have dreamed of.”

USQ College Deputy Director, English Language, Kate Kuzma said more than 2,500 students a year undertake USQ’s Tertiary Preparation Program.

“Pathway programs are an ideal way for students to make the leap into higher education as they help students learn the skills and knowledge they need to be successful in further study,” Ms Kuzma said.

“We’re very proud to be able to put the spotlight on some of our pathway program success stories as part of World Access to Higher Education Day and showcase their achievements in the face of adversity.”

Register for the World Access to High Education Day Webinar on Monday, November 15.

woman in classroom
When Amani Borghoul was a little girl growing up in Syria, she dreamed of having a job where she could help people.