Skip to content

Remembrance Day News Bulletin

A number of University of Southern Queensland experts are available for comment.
TAGS:

WAR AND REMEMBRANCE IN CHILDREN’S BOOKS

Although war can be a difficult subject to talk about with children, it doesn’t mean they shouldn’t be prevented from engaging with the topic.

  • Arts education expert Professor Margaret Baguley says picture books and illustrations are a great way to help children better understand Australian history and strengthen children’s connection with Australia’s ANZAC history. Media contact: Griffith Thomas 0423 234 822 or Sarah Green 0417 799 331

USING MEMORIALS AND MONUMENTS IN CLASSROOMS

Despite their powerful presence in the commemorative landscape and their capacity to communicate an officially sanctioned view of history, or as they have more recently to challenge it, memorials and monuments are underutilised as educational resources.

  • Associate Professor Martin Kerby’s research interests focus on biography, historical inquiry and artistic and cultural responses to conflict. He can discuss the origins of Remembrance Day and its traditions, as well as how monuments and memorials have helped shape national understandings of democracy, human rights and social justice. Media contact: Griffith Thomas 0423 234 822 or Sarah Green 0417 799 331

REMEMBERING FROMELLES

This year marks the 105-year anniversary of The Battle of Fromelles – known as ‘Australia’s bloodiest battle’ – which lasted less than 24 hours and claimed the lives of more than 5000 Australian soldiers. Until recent years, 1335 Australian soldiers remained ‘missing’ from the Fromelles battle, having no known grave. Then in 2007, the remains of about 250 Australians soldiers who were buried in a mass grave at Pheasant Wood, France, were recovered.

  • Natasha Heap has conducted research work with the Fromelles Association of Australia of Australia which is dedicated to identifying and commemorating the soldiers who fought and lost their lives near Fromelles during World War I. Her research focused on the highest ranked officer killed in The Battle of Fromelles, Lieutenant Colonel Bertie Norris, who was identified in 2010. Media contact: Griffith Thomas 0423 234 822 or Sarah Green 0417 799 331
poppies in field
As Remembrance Day approaches, a number of University of Southern Queensland experts are available for comment.